September is National Cholesterol Awareness Month

Seventy-one million American adults have high cholesterol, but only one-third of them have the condition under control.

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that your body needs. But when you have too much in your blood, it can build up on the walls of your arteries and form blockages. This can lead to heart disease, heart attack, and stroke.

There are two kinds of cholesterol: high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). HDL is also called “good” cholesterol. LDL is called “bad” cholesterol. When we talk about high cholesterol, we are talking about “bad” LDL cholesterol.

There are ways to help you control and lower your cholesterol. Some of them are:

  • Eating a healthy diet.
  • Exercising regularly.
  • Maintaining a healthy weight.
  • Not smoking.
  • Prescription medication from your doctor

It is important to have your cholesterol levels checked by a doctor. It is a simple blood test and can be lifesaving. Have your cholesterol checked during National Cholesterol Awareness Month!

For more information on cholesterol, visit www.cdc.gov.

Author: Molly Rosenquist

Health & Wellness Coordinator

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