Slip and Fall Prevention: Snow and Ice Removal

This winter has left us with an exuberant amount of snow and ice, and as a result, slip and fall incidents are on the rise.

Whether you have your employees perform snow/ice removal, or you hire a contractor to do it, a few procedures should be put in place.

–          Designate someone to monitor snow/ice conditions.  This person will be responsible for coordinating the removal operations when one inch or more of snow has fallen or if ice conditions are present

–          Snow/ice removal equipment (shovels, ice melt, snow blowers, etc.)  should be available and ready to go

–          De-icing products should be applied to walkways in front of entrances

–          Monitor the inside areas of the building closely for wet areas as snow/ice will melt from foot traffic and cause water to accumulate

–          Isolate problem areas by closing them to the general public, or install signs warning of the potential slip hazard

If a contractor is used, the following guidelines should apply:

–          The contractor should provide you with a certificate of insurance that names your company as an additional insured under their General Liability policy

–          A written contract should be used with a hold harmless/indemnification clause included

–          The areas of your property the contractor is responsible for should be documented (ie., front and rear parking lots, sidewalks, etc.)

–          The contractor should have guidelines as to a maximum timeframe in which to complete the snow removal (ie., two hours after the snow has ended)

For More Information: Reference Article- “Slip and Fall Prevention: Snow and Ice Removal” GuideOne Insurance (https://www.guideone.com/…/slipfall_snow.pdf)

Author: Gina M. Callahan, Claims Consultant

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